Story — Medical supervision: what to do about the cows…..?

January 14, 2017Getu Adyeeri, Kule Mulyanzusu, Prosper Isingoma, Story, Tekele Health Centre

Supervision of rural health centres is one of the key roles of the Semiliki-supported regional medical coordinators. But what does medical supervision involve in practice? Kule, Boga region medical coordinator, and Prosper from the National Medical Coordination team, recently visited Tekele Health Centre. Read on to learn about what the supervision involved, and some of the unusual challenges they found in Tekele. 

The first challenge in medical supervision is getting to the centres, which can often involve long journeys and multiple means of transport. Kule and Prosper used motorbikes and pirogue boats to get to Tekele from their base in Bunia. This time it was a relatively short journey of around three hours.

Kule on motorbike/pirogue
Prosper before the crossing at Tekele towards Sota, Bunia 

Once on site, Kule and Prosper were able to talk to the four medical workers in the centre, to make sure their work is meeting certain standards, and suggest improvements in their practice. These visits help build the capacity of small health centres in caring for primary medical needs for the local community (the Health Centre at Tekele serves a population of 11,000, treating an average of 370 patients a month). Supervision visits are also an important accountability mechanism.

Kule meets with Mrs Getu Adyeeri, nurse-in-charge of Tekele Health Centre

Through this visit, it was good to learn that the Tekele team is doing many things well, such as keeping up-to-date accounts of its work, but is facing huge challenges. The building itself is in poor condition (see below); temperatures are hot inside for patients, and termites make storing medicines difficult. There is no drinking water on site, and the fridge where medication is kept blew a fuse during a recent thunder storm. Lastly, local cattle, following the shade, are increasingly causing trouble to the Centre, wandering into toilets and showers, as well as damaging the incinerator. So what is the most urgent medical priority for the community in Tekele……? Putting up a fence to keep the cows out!

With all these challenges, Tekele Health Centre is grateful to be supported by Semiliki and the medical coordinators, as they work to help them meet the local population’s health needs.

Tekele Health Centre

Share this

Related Stories

The dangers of going about the job in Congo

Getting best value for money in Boga

Recovering from conflict

Transforming Bukiringi

The joy of reading

Improving living conditions at the Compassion Orphanage

Wavy lines

Semiliki Christmas Appeal 2018

Ebola continues to take its toll

Lorry load of operating kit arrives safely in Congo

Who needs building regs…..?

Putting the roof back on…….

Semiliki — helping the most vulnerable every day

What’s going on in Congo?

Cutting the ribbon at St Matthieu!

Many mouths to feed…..

First incision……

Will it be ready for the opening ceremony….?

Towards peace and reconciliation in Rutshuru

Welcoming Ande to Oxford

The daily chores

Self-support for sustainability

Half way there….!

Music and medicine

right

Restoring dignity

right

Life at Olongba Health Centre

All set to start building at St Matthieu

Keyboards for efficient health systems

Keeping teeth in order…

Building new inpatient block in Beni

A tutorial in brick making….

DRC Travels Part 3

DRC Travels Part 2

DRC Travels Part 1

The sky’s the limit!

Semiliki Conservation

Orphanage Evacuates!

Moving On(line)

Film: Seeds of Hope

Good news from Cirunga!

Crossing the Semiliki river!

Land for Orphans

New Mattresses

Visit in Goma

New Medical Books!

They did it!

St Matthieu Update

Great River Race

How to build a floor

Maternity Construction

left

New Blog Launched!

Newsletter

Subscribe to receive our semi-regular email newsletter.

Menu